NHCW - Healthcare for the Homeless Day

Healthcare for the Homeless Day

Although all health centers provide care to people with limited incomes, the Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) program provides targeted funding to meet the needs of those living without stable housing. Collectively, health centers serve 1.3 million individuals experiencing homelessness each year, with about 1 million of these individuals served by the 300 health centers that receive HCH funding.

People who experience homelessness incur a number of health issues on the streets or in shelters, and being without housing can exacerbate current health conditions. People without homes endure higher rates of chronic and acute disease, behavioral health conditions, and other needs that make them particularly vulnerable to poor health, disability, and early death. HCH’s provide high-quality, comprehensive primary and behavioral health care, case management, outreach, and other supportive services to meet the needs of people experiencing homelessness. Due to the nature of homelessness, services are intentionally provided in trauma-informed ways that provide healing, choice, safety, and trust while honoring consumers as partners in care and experts in their own lives.

National Health Center Week is a time to honor and celebrate the work being done at HCHs and to advocate for policies that end homelessness by providing comprehensive housing and health care as a human right. Learn more and find ways to get involved with HCH day on the National Health Care for the Homeless Council’s page or by contacting Katherine Cavanaugh, Consumer Advocate at the National Health Care for the Homeless Council at kcavanaugh@nhchc.org or 443-703-1320.

National Health Care for the Homeless Council logo
Back to school

Back-to-School Immunizations

We’ve heard a lot about the COVID-19 vaccine lately, but less attention has been paid to the broader vaccines children need to attend school.

Idaho’s School Immunization Law requires that children be up-to-date on their immunizations in order to prevent diseases like measles and whooping cough that spread quickly in group settings. Children need to be protected before they enter school, and generally need a booster shot before kindergarten. This handy chart from the State of Idaho offers guidance around which vaccines are needed and by when.

Children age 12 and older are now able to receive the COVID-19 vaccination.

Generally, all vaccines offer full protection after two to four weeks, so plan in advance to vaccinate your children for this school year. If you have questions about vaccinating your child or want to make an appointment, set up an appointment by calling us at 208-620-5250.

To prevent COVID-19 and other diseases, including colds and the flu, children should be encouraged to wash their hands, practice good hygiene and cover all coughs and sneezes. If a child is sick, please keep them home and do not expose the school community.

 

Immunization Requirements by Grade